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20130113
20130121
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these trees. but for this grandmother, the environment is no longer a priority. >> it is a shame, people worked hard to grow those trees, and now we're cutting them down, but how else can we stay warm? the water is freezing cold. how can we cope or wash or make bread? >> these families have worked hard to stay alive, digging a trench for the children to jump into the ring air and artillery attacks. behind the home, something much more substantial dug into the ground. it took these people 30 days to cut into this rock to build this homemade bunker. it is cold and dark, but it is where they run to when the shelling starts. for families can spend the night here, if they're too scared to come out until the bombardment is over. >> we dug the cave to protect our children from the shelling. we are old. we are not afraid to die. we no longer care about ourselves, but we are worried that the children could be terrify the rest of their lives. >> this person kept a diary since the start of the war. she writes it for herself and the other children, to help them caulker their fears. >> all the storie
of lifestyle. it's really wanting to understand the genetic bases of it and how the environment interacts with the genetic experience to give us the risks. >> the risks of diseases like cancer and heart disease are set to increase as more africans start eating food with high calories. by 2030, the world health organization fears they'll overtake diseases like hiv-aids as the continent's biggest killers. though africa has the greatest genetic diversity of any continent, the population has been around the longest. very little is known about people's genes compared to europeans, americans or asians. yet that knowledge could be vital in combating a future health crisis. the research will also strengthen science in africa. >> it's opening up opportunities for young researchers such as myself, it's a way we get to collaborate other researchers from africa. >> scientists in 18 countries are taking part in the pan-african research program attempting to unravel genetic secrets they believe have been kept far too long. tanya paige, joe ha happen esburg. >> it's been a tradition for centuries but an
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